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SOURCE: IDRW NEWS NETWORK

Indigenous 180 hp Diesel turboprop engine

After developing an Indigenous 180 hp Diesel turboprop engine that is suitable for small aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) which was extensively tested on the latest prototype of the Tapas medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), DRDO’s Combat Vehicles Research & Development Establishment (CVRDE) is now developing an uprated 220 hp Diesel turboprop engine variant that is further development of the present engine that was in testing from 2017 onwards.

According to Industrial sources close to idrw.org, the previous 180 hp Diesel turboprop engine has full take-off power till service ceiling of 11000 feet, but a new uprated 220 hp Diesel turboprop engine will have full take-off power till service ceiling of 15000 feet that will vastly improve in-flight capabilities of the Tapas UAV that already has demonstrated eight hours of flight at an altitude of 16,000 feet and soon will demonstrate 18 hours flight time at a height of over 27,000 feet.

Indigenous 180 hp Diesel turboprop engine is based on a Diesel automotive conversion engine which means that this is a turboprop engine that is specifically modified for aviation from a modern automotive diesel engine which CVRDE jointly developed with Jayem Automotives Pvt Ltd which specializes in the development of individual components of a powertrain like an engine, transmission, controls, and electric motor for the Indian automobile sector. The new engine will fit in the previous UAV engine packaging cover and will weigh the same due to the usage of the new aluminum cylinder block design.

Tapas is a 9.5 m-long medium-altitude long-endurance (MALE) unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) with a wingspan of 20.6 m and can carry a 350kgs payload to conduct intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) missions. DRDO plans to conclude final trials by mid-2022.

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