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SOURCE: IDRW NEWS NETWORK

DRDO’s Gas Turbine and Research Establishment (GTRE) will be partnering with Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL) for the manufacturing of the Dry Kaveri engine to be used on India’s Unmanned Stealth bomber program. The Engine Division at Koraput, a unit of HAL’s vast network will be manufacturing Dry Kaveri engine when it completes its certification by 2024 and enters production, as informed to idrw.org .

Dry Kaveri engine minus its afterburner section was for the first time showcased earlier this year at Aero India 2021 and GTRE has started manufacturing four pre-production Dry Kaveri engine that will be used for further flight trials and testing of the engine before it is cleared for production by 2024-25. Dry Kaveri engine will have a Dry Thrust of 46kN and soon test of the engine in the indoor aerospace testbed will commence, so that the data can be collected from different parameters on the engine, using an intricate web of sensors that detects even the tiniest vibrations that will help analytical models and engineers in better monitoring and for crucial insights to inform future engine improvements for availability and efficiency.

Defense Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) of DRDO, recently established the near isothermal forging technology to produce all the five stages of high-pressure compressors (HPC) discs out of difficult-to-deform titanium alloy using its unique 2000 MT isothermal forge press. DMRL can manufacture any type of HPC discs for any engine type locally thus saving millions of precious foreign exchange. HPC discs are the most replaced component in a jet engine and localization of such critical components will come as a boom to the indigenous jet engine program.

Mishra Dhatu Nigam Limited or MIDHANI will be involved in the supply of specialised alloys such as steel, titanium, and nickel for making the main body parts and the engine.

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