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SOURCE: IDRW NEWS NETWORK

The Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) had first revealed the development of a man-portable air-defense system last year when it issued a request for proposal (RFP) for the supply of 5 optical components for the MPDMS (Man-Portable Defensive Missile System) and at the Aero India 2021 event, it was clear that the state-owned aerospace and defense company Bharat Electronics (BEL) has started the process of fabrication of first 5 prototypes, that are likely to be tested in coming days as per information provided by an industrial sources close to idrw.org.

DRDO’s MPDMS is the most advanced MANPAD under development in the world and Hyderabad-based Grene Robotics is developing an Autonomous MANPAD Data Link (ADML) system, which will bring isolated man-portable air-defense system (MANPAD) operators into a networked environment. AMDL is a state-of-the-art data link system, which exploits AI to provide a comprehensive air defense solution. India will be the first country in the world to deploy such technology on MANPADS that are forward-deployed Air Defence Systems widely used across the world.

ADML will reduce incidents of friendly fire accidents and will provide real-time target assignment and complete engagement cycle management. MPDMS will have a Dual-band infrared homing seeker or multi-spectral optical seeker weighing less than 20 kgs, with fire and forget capability and the capability to engage aerial targets by day and night with an effective range of 6kms, and height of engagement over 3.5kms.

DRDO after developing Akash, Akash1S, Akash-NG, QRSAM, MR-SAM, and VL-SRSAM, DRDO is now on verge of developing MPDMS that will complete a full cycle of indigenous air defense systems in its arsenal. DRDO is also working on the development of the XRSAM Air Defence System that will be an S300 Class Air Defence System with a range of 350km.

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